What Is War Robots: The Reality And Personal Takes

This is an icon of War Robots now.

You might be asking, what is War Robots now?

This piece would hopefully answer the question, both for the newcomers and the long-time veterans.

This is not a tutorial or an analysis of the game. You can consider this as a sort of introduction and a review of the current state of the title. You can also consider this as a discussion of the peripheral issues that are related to the game today.

What is War Robots?

This game, created by Pixonic (a Russian subsidiary of Mail.ru), has hundreds of millions of registered accounts all over the world.

It is originally designed to be a tactical mobile mech game in 2014, featuring modes such as Domination, Free for All, Beacon Rush, Team Deathmatch and even King of the Hill. It also features limited time events such as Skirmish and Arena.

As of today, it is clear that War Robots is now officially a multiplayer online battle arena, with one movement pad and up to two buttons that you need to press in order to maximize your playing potential. If you are a MechWarrior fan and you came here for a tactical experience, let me tell you this in advance: There’s no more room here for meticulous planning and thinking time as individual skill and supreme reflexes come to the fore in this game.

The game features a hard pay-to-win component (i.e. buying content such as robots, modules and weapons) and a soft pay-to-win portion (i.e. a leveling system that requires the use of the game’s soft currency, which is gold).

What can you expect from War Robots?

Expect a game that focuses on extreme levels of power creep and where each balancing act is designed not to make every robot viable, but to open the path for the new metagame to dominate the landscape of the game.

While it is true that long-time players of MOBA titles would feel at home here, they would also be taken aback by the amount of resources required to maintain a strong presence inside the game. To make a very rough comparison, SuperCell (the notorious makers of Clash of Clans and Clash Royale, ahem, ahem, ahem) actually spend money when it comes to community engagement (parties, community interactions, etc.) and towards cultivating a competitive culture (tournaments, the Esports angle, prize money, etc.), thus ensuring that there is a sort of return when it comes to player’s investments.

In War Robots, this simply DOES NOT EXIST. Let this be clear: The only thing you will get back is the feeling that you are at the top of the War Robots food chain.

Despite this, there is a ton of individual and clan rivalries in the game. This shows how lively the game is at the moment, despite a certain level of dissatisfaction and the occasional boycott that is associated with War Robots.

The current state of War Robots, as far as the human dimension is concerned, is that there are clans who spend hundreds or thousands of dollars, legal (there are a ton of skilled players at the top with disposable income and/or who know how to spend smartly, they can even beat normal random players with three of their players not doing anything) or otherwise (there’s a reason why those “rumors” and “exposes” exist). This is followed by the “prominent” (those who can upset these clans in official tournaments) or “national” clans (clans that represent the identity of a country), then the “competitive” clans (the upstart ones), the “specialist” clans (those who focus in Six-Pack League, play an all-Natasha lineup or do some other stuff) and the casual ones. In short, War Robots carries a huge, albeit polarized player base at the moment.

Objectively speaking, War Robots is quite big right now in its sector, and is easily the . This year though, the Eastern-style mobile mech games are coming out in force (Super Mecha Champions, Gundam Battle: Gunpla Warfare, etc.), so War Robots would have to do something to protect its market base – which, we hope, would lead to a better experience for the player base.

Why do I need to know the state of War Robots?

You may be thinking that it is a waste of time, effort and (internet bandwidth) to write about these things. But at the same time, (we) writers in general feel that WRITING is a valuable outlet to express opinions, ideas and show the rest of the world how games work and what their state is (in this case, War Robots).

Besides, YouTubers do it every single day, so why not do it in writing as well?

There are many reasons why should you know about the state of the game. First, it allows you to be able to try to see things from different perspectives. Second, it actually promotes community engagement through the connection that is provided by interviews and features. Finally, this is one of the ways that we express our love of the game – by providing a platform where we try to be as objective as humanly possible while

Most importantly, it allows you to see the different narratives that go through War Robots at any single time.

Why write about War Robots?

Let’s face this reality: Remember that there is no dedicated outlet that focuses on mobile mech at the moment. Mech Spectrum is not actively posting their things on their website for more than a year now, so there’s also the “social” and “journalistic” aspect of that.

Besides, personally, this is the way that I can combine my love for games and my inclination towards creative writing. So, I write about War Robots!

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